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3 Day Tuna Diet

The 3 day tuna diet is a good idea whose time has passed.

Fifty years ago it was not unusual for bodybuilders preparing for a contest to go on a diet of tuna and water for a few days.  They did it because it worked.

Tuna is nutritious, delicious, relatively inexpensive food.  It’s high in protein (a small can packed in water has about 24 grams of protein).  It has beneficial omega 3 fats and no carbohydrates.  A 3 day tuna diet used to be an excellent short-term diet for breaking through fat loss plateaus.

No longer.  Why?  Mercury contamination.

As we humans continue our polluting ways, toxic heavy metals get into the food chain.  As small fish are eaten by larger fish, mercury and other toxins build up in larger fish like tuna.  For that reason, it’s no longer a good idea to eat more than 1 or 2 servings of tuna weekly.

However, a temporary fish and water diet can still be beneficial.  The trick is to substitute smaller deep water, oily fish for tuna.

Which fish?  Eat a variety.  Excellent choices include wild caught salmon (such as sockeye salmon), Alaskan halibut, orange roughy, sardines, anchovies, Chilean sea bass, mackerel and trout.

Since some of these are more expensive than others and they have very different tastes and textures, try them for yourself before going on a 3 day fish diet, an updated version of the 3 day tuna diet.

If you do not typically eat a no or low carbohydrate diet, be prepared for headaches and other minor physical problems.  Don’t worry, though, about not ingesting enough carbohydrate:  the minimum daily requirement for carbohydrates is zero.  There’s no need to worry about not getting enough fiber for several days, either.

This diet is very simple.  Eat a serving of fish about every 3 or 4 waking hours.  Drink plenty of water.  It’s a good idea to supplement with multi-vitamin, multi-mineral pills.

Even if you are in good health and even though this is a temporary diet, it’s a good idea to check with your personal physician before changing any dietary or exercise patterns.

If you use this diet, feel free to share your results with others using the comments below.  Good luck!

Posted in physical well-being

4 COMMENTS

David, Wild Planet Foods - posted on 19/08/2010 1:51 pm

Thanks for the article! Tuna can have low mercury if they are fished through sustainable methods. Our troll-caught albacore in the North Pacific fishery are lower in mercury because these migratory fish are smaller (about 9 to 25 pounds) than the long-line caught older fish that reach up to 70 pounds after ten to fifteen years of growth. Naturally, the longer a fish lives and feeds, the more it bio-accumulates mercury. I hope that helps, looking forward to reading more of your posts. Thanks!

got mercury - posted on 19/08/2010 4:18 pm

A new study found that 37% of mercury exposure in the U.S. comes from eating tuna, all kinds of tuna. An excellent resource to learn more about which fish is safer to eat is the free on-line mercury calculator at http://www.gotmercury.org

Anita - posted on 20/08/2010 12:18 pm

Another good post, Dennis.

Bee - posted on 20/08/2010 12:21 pm

Yes, I so agree, Dennis.


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